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CBD Tincture

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CBD Genesis Liquid 1000mg

is addiction? What

vfubr
01.12.2018

Content:

  • is addiction? What
  • American Society of Addiction Medicine
  • What are addictions?
  • Addiction is an often chronic disease that affects the structure than 1 in 7 people—abuse or are addicted to nicotine, alcohol or other drugs. Addiction is a complex condition, a brain disease that is manifested by compulsive substance use despite harmful consequence. People with addiction (severe substance use disorder) have an intense focus on using a certain substance(s), such as alcohol or drugs, to the point that it. Addiction can be substance or behavior related. Learn what causes an addiction and how treatment works.

    is addiction? What

    Once a person experiences withdrawal from drug use or comparable behaviors, there is an anxious, agitated, dysphoric and labile emotional experience, related to suboptimal reward and the recruitment of brain and hormonal stress systems, which is associated with withdrawal from virtually all pharmacological classes of addictive drugs.

    Simply put, addiction is not a desired condition. As addiction is a chronic disease, periods of relapse, which may interrupt spans of remission, are a common feature of addiction. It is also important to recognize that return to drug use or pathological pursuit of rewards is not inevitable. Clinical interventions can be quite effective in altering the course of addiction. Close monitoring of the behaviors of the individual and contingency management, sometimes including behavioral consequences for relapse behaviors, can contribute to positive clinical outcomes.

    Engagement in health promotion activities which promote personal responsibility and accountability, connection with others, and personal growth also contribute to recovery. It is important to recognize that addiction can cause disability or premature death, especially when left untreated or treated inadequately. The qualitative ways in which the brain and behavior respond to drug exposure and engagement in addictive behaviors are different at later stages of addiction than in earlier stages, indicating progression, which may not be overtly apparent.

    As is the case with other chronic diseases, the condition must be monitored and managed over time to:. In some cases of addiction, medication management can improve treatment outcomes. In most cases of addiction, the integration of psychosocial rehabilitation and ongoing care with evidence-based pharmacological therapy provides the best results. Chronic disease management is important for minimization of episodes of relapse and their impact. Addiction professionals and persons in recovery know the hope that is found in recovery.

    Recovery is available even to persons who may not at first be able to perceive this hope, especially when the focus is on linking the health consequences to the disease of addiction.

    As in other health conditions, self-management, with mutual support, is very important in recovery from addiction. Recovery from addiction is best achieved through a combination of self-management, mutual support, and professional care provided by trained and certified professionals. May 01, , Revised: The neurobiology of reward has been well understood for decades, whereas the neurobiology of addiction is still being explored. Most clinicians have learned of reward pathways including projections from the ventral tegmental area VTA of the brain, through the median forebrain bundle MFB , and terminating in the nucleus accumbens Nuc Acc , in which dopamine neurons are prominent.

    Current neuroscience recognizes that the neurocircuitry of reward also involves a rich bi-directional circuitry connecting the nucleus accumbens and the basal forebrain.

    It is the reward circuitry where reward is registered, and where the most fundamental rewards such as food, hydration, sex, and nurturing exert a strong and life-sustaining influence. Alcohol, nicotine, other drugs and pathological gambling behaviors exert their initial effects by acting on the same reward circuitry that appears in the brain to make food and sex, for example, profoundly reinforcing.

    Other effects, such as intoxication and emotional euphoria from rewards, derive from activation of the reward circuitry. While intoxication and withdrawal are well understood through the study of reward circuitry, understanding of addiction requires understanding of a broader network of neural connections involving forebrain as well as midbrain structures. Although these characteristic features are widely present in most cases of addiction, regardless of the pharmacology of the substance use seen in addiction or the reward that is pathologically pursued, each feature may not be equally prominent in every case.

    The diagnosis of addiction requires a comprehensive biological, psychological, social and spiritual assessment by a trained and certified professional. In this document, the term "addictive behaviors" refers to behaviors that are commonly rewarding and are a feature in many cases of addiction. Exposure to these behaviors, just as occurs with exposure to rewarding drugs, is facilitative of the addiction process rather than causative of addiction.

    The state of brain anatomy and physiology is the underlying variable that is more directly causative of addiction. The anatomy the brain circuitry involved and the physiology the neuro-transmitters involved in these three modes of relapse drug- or reward-triggered relapse vs. Reward-triggered relapse also is mediated by glutamatergic circuits projecting to the nucleus accumbens from the frontal cortex.

    Relapse triggered by exposure to conditioned cues from the environment involves glutamate circuits, originating in frontal cortex, insula, hippocampus and amygdala projecting to mesolimbic incentive salience circuitry. Relapse triggered by exposure to stressful experiences involves brain stress circuits beyond the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is well known as the core of the endocrine stress system. There are two of these relapse-triggering brain stress circuits — one originates in noradrenergic nucleus A2 in the lateral tegmental area of the brain stem and projects to the hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, frontal cortex, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and uses norepinephrine as its neurotransmitter; the other originates in the central nucleus of the amygdala, projects to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and uses corticotrophin-releasing factor CRF as its neurotransmitter.

    Pathologically pursuing reward mentioned in the Short Version of this definition thus has multiple components. It is not necessarily the amount of exposure to the reward e. In addiction, pursuit of rewards persists, despite life problems that accumulate due to addictive behaviors, even when engagement in the behaviors ceases to be pleasurable.

    Similarly, in earlier stages of addiction, or even before the outward manifestations of addiction have become apparent, substance use or engagement in addictive behaviors can be an attempt to pursue relief from dysphoria; while in later stages of the disease, engagement in addictive behaviors can persist even though the behavior no longer provides relief.

    Thoroughly updated with the latest international evidence-based research and best practices, the comprehensive 6th edition of the ASAM flagship textbook reviews the science and art behind addiction medicine. Provides guidance about the effective use of drug testing in the identification, diagnosis, treatment and promotion of recovery for patients with, or at risk for, addiction. American Society of Addiction Medicine. We use session cookies to allow our website to function effectively.

    By dismissing this notice, you are consenting to their use. A person who is addicted to something can't control how they use it, or need it to get through every day life. Addictions can be to substances, like alcohol, tobacco or other drugs, or to behaviours, like gambling or extreme exercise. Addictions are a problem when they start to affect health in a bad way or interfere with a person's ability to lead a normal life, as well as the people around them.

    A person might start to take a drug or engage in an activity because it's enjoyable and not have a problem with it at first. They might do it because they feel it helps them relax or to cope with stress by covering up bad feelings.

    As time goes by, the person might find they need to do or take more of a thing to get the same effect. They can soon feel they need to take or do the thing to feel 'normal'. Some substances make changes to our bodies so that, over time, our bodies really do 'need' the substance to work normally.

    If they don't get enough of it, the person gets cravings or 'withdrawal'. Addiction often damages other areas of their lives like money, their relationships, studies and career.

    Living with or just being around people who have problems with alcohol, drugs or other addictions can be hard. If you can't speak to a trusted friend, teacher or relative, call Childline free at any time on

    American Society of Addiction Medicine

    Although all addictions have the capacity to induce a sense of hopelessness and feelings of failure, as well as shame and guilt, research documents that. Addiction is a disease in which a person finds themselves unable to stop using a substance or engaging in a behavior. It can damage physical. This topic center provides a range of articles on definitions and ways to understand addiction.

    What are addictions?



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    rgtrgarg

    Although all addictions have the capacity to induce a sense of hopelessness and feelings of failure, as well as shame and guilt, research documents that.

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